Title Capitalization Tool

Instructions Type or paste your title(s) in the box on the left side. Put each title on a new line. Converted titles will appear in the box on the right. The bottom border will turn green to show that the titles have been converted successfully. Click the “Copy” button to copy all titles to your clipboard. Click the “Clear” button to reset the text box.

How to Capitalize Your Titles

Title case is a style that is traditionally used for the titles of blogs, newspapers, books, movies, songs, essays, and other works. In title case, all major words are capitalized, while minor words are lowercased. Titles are slightly differ according to the publication's style guide. The Title Capitalization Tool will apply your choice of title case style rules for you!

Capitalizing Blog Post Titles

It is important to capitalize your blog post titles correctly and consistently. The AP and CMS styles are preferred, where you capitalize major words and lowercase most minor words. Proper title capitalization gives users a good first impression that your blog is professionally written and you have an eye for detail.

Some of the standard title capitalization rules are:

  • Capitalize the first and the last word.
  • Capitalize nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, and subordinate conjunctions.
  • Lowercase (a, an, the), coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions.
  • Lowercase the “to” in an infinitive (I want to play baseball).

How to Choose the Right Style Manual

Style manuals are reference books that tell writers how to handle grammar, punctuation, and any special use cases. Most businesses adopt either the AP Stylebook or the Chicago Manual of Style. It's up to you to decide which manual you'd like your brand to follow.

Here is a list of the most popular publication style guide standards for your reference.

Associated Press (AP)Journalistic

The Associated Press Stylebook is the obvious choice for journalists and news writers. It may also be the best choice for freelance writers, bloggers and organizations that create news-centric content or want to instill journalistic sensibilities into their writing. It has special sections dedicated to areas of interest such as fashion, food, and sports.

  • Capitalize the first and last words in the title and in any subtitle
  • Capitalize all words with four or more letters
  • Capitalize all major words in the title, including those after a hyphen. Major words include nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns
  • Lowercase everything else, which includes coordinating conjunctions, articles, and prepositions (when fewer than four letters)

American Psychological Association (APA)Academic

The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association is for academic writing and research in the social and behavioral sciences. It’s also an excellent option for bloggers and independent authors who write about topics within those fields of study.

  • Capitalize the first and last words in the title and in any subtitle
  • Capitalize all words with four or more letters
  • Capitalize major words, including verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns
  • Capitalize each word in a hyphenated compound
  • Lowercase coordinating conjunctions, articles, and prepositions (when fewer than four letters)

Chicago Manual of Style (CMS)Academic

The Chicago Manual of Style is the best option for general business writers, including copywriters, bloggers, and many technical writers. It is beloved by writers, editors, and publishers. It’s the standard for book publishing in fiction and nonfiction and is often used in the arts and humanities for academic papers.

  • Capitalize the first and last words in the title and in any subtitle
  • Capitalize nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and conjunctions (but not “and,” “but,” “for,” “or,” “nor”)
  • Lowercase all prepositions unless they are used adverbially or adjectivally
  • Lowercase the articles (“a,” “an,” “the”)
  • Lowercase “to” as part of an infinite as in “to run”
  • Lowercase “as” in all instances
  • Lowercase the parts of proper names that would normally be lowercase, like “von” in Georg von Trapp or “van” in Vincent van Gogh
  • Lowercase the second part of a species name, as in “Homo sapiens
  • For hyphenated compounds, always capitalize the first word. Capitalize subsequent words unless they are articles, prepositions, or coordinating conjunctions, or a musical symbol (like “sharp” in F-sharp). If the first word is a prefix that could not stand on its own, then lowercase the following word (for example, “Anti-theft”). Capitalize all words in hyphenated numbers or fractions

Modern Language Association (MLA)Academic

The Modern Language Association of America’s MLA Handbook is geared toward humanities students. This is likely the style first introduced to most writing students and undergrads. It does carry some similarities to CMS teachings, although it's more focused on citation and documentation.

  • Capitalize the first and last words in the title and in any subtitle
  • Capitalize nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and subordinating conjunctions
  • Lowercase articles, prepositions, coordinating conjunctions, and the “to” in infinitives
  • Capitalize all words in a hyphenated compound

New York Times (NYT)Journalistic

The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage is the official Style Guide used by the Writers and Editors the New York Times Newspaper. It is for anyone who writes a short stories, business plans, a book report and of course news article.

  • Capitalize the first and last words in the title and in any subtitle
  • Capitalize all words with four or more letters
  • Capitalize nouns, pronouns, and verbs
  • Capitalize “no,” “nor,” “not,” “off,” “out,” “so,” “up”
  • Capitalize prepositions with fewer than four letters when they are used adverbally, adjectivally, or to modify a verb
  • Capitalize “for” when it takes the place of a verb to mean support or advocate
  • Lowercase “a,” “and,” “as,” “at,” “but,” “by,” “en,” “for,” “if,” “in,” “of,” “on,” “or,” “the,” “to,” “v.,” “vs.,” “via”
  • Lowercase the “to” in infinitives
  • Capitalize hyphenated compounds unless the compound is formed from a prefix of two or three letters that is used to separate doubled vowels. If a prefix has four letters or more, capitalize both words in the compound

Wikipedia (WP)Academic

The Manual of Style for Wikipedia is for writing articles using straightforward, succinct, easily understood language and structured articles with consistent, reader-friendly layouts and formatting. It is use throughout Wikipedia's primary pages and articles.

  • Capitalize the first and last word of the title
  • Capitalize adjectives, adverbs, nouns, subordinating conjunctions, and verbs
  • Capitalize prepositions of five letters or more
  • Capitalize prepositions when used in phrasal verbs or compound prepositions
  • Lowercase articles (a, an, the)
  • Lowercase coordinating conjunctions
  • Lowercase prepositions of four letters or fewer
  • Lowercase the “to” in infinitives
  • Follow standard practice in hyphenated compounds. If no standard exists, lowercase the word after the hyphen
  • Capitalize the first word in a subtitle after a colon or dash

Caution The Capitalization Tool is just some code trying its best to uppercase your titles according to the rules of your chosen style. Sometimes, though, it won't work just right. In particular, The Capitalization Tool might not recognize when a preposition should be capitalized when it's used adverbally, adjectivally, or to modify a verb.